Allodial Title, Land Patent. Here’s the question.

Some folks that run for public office, claim to be Conservatives, supporting Constitutional Laws. Ask your rep at your next public meeting, if they support property rights. Ask them if they hold an Allodial Titles. If not they are not Constitutional Conservatives. Below is a response from a reader. Thanks Debra!

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Below is what information I learned after paying cash for my home and wanting to secure it from any taking. I will update if my plan proves successful.

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Essentially, a Land Patent is the first conveyance of title ownership to land which the U.S. Government grants a citizen who applies for one. One of the earliest laws for granting Land Patents was passed by Congress on April 24, 1820

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Later on, in 1862, a Homestead Act stated in Section 4: “That no lands acquired under the provisions of this act shall in any event become liable to the satisfaction of any debt or debts contracted prior to the issuing of the patent therefor”.

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The one major pitfall, that must be avoided, is that when filing the declaration of land patents, do not place the same legal description in the declarations that was in the original land patent issued by the Bureau of Land Management. What this does is cloud the title to the property of other persons who are living in properties that are part of the legal description of the original land patent. As a result, several lawsuits were filed to quiet title. To prevent this from happening, you must write in your Declaration of Land Patent only the legal description of the property to which you are an assignee. In other words, the legal description from your deed or abstract is what you must use. For this reason, the enclosed Declaration of Land Patent has in it, adequate language for this purpose. A Declaration of Homestead should be attached to your Declaration of Land Patent, but the legal description in your Declaration of Homestead must be 160 acres or less to comply with Federal Law on filing Homesteads. Along with the declaration of Land Patent and the Declaration of Homestead is a certified copy of the original land patent which you can obtain from your nearest land office. These papers are all stapled together and filed in either your County Recorder’s office or with the Register of Deeds.

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DO NOT SEND CHECKS. SEND MONEY ORDERS ONLY / MAKE PAYABLE TO: Bureau of Land Management
After you receive your copy of the original Land Patent or Land Grant, then staple it to a Declaration of Land Patent and file it in your County Recorder’s office or Register of Deeds. You now have your allodial title. If you haven’t filed a Declaration of Homestead, then you should do so and attach it to your Land Patent. You may file a Declaration of Homestead on up to 160 [64] acres, but not more. A Declaration of Homestead can only be filed on property that you actually live on. A Land Patent can only be filed on property that has been assigned to you. You don’t file one on your neighbor’s property or they can sue you for slandering his title.

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A Declaration of Homestead should be filed whether or not you file a Land Patent. It may be filed with, before, or after your lawsuit is filed. Both Land Patents and Declarations of Homestead must be Notarized. A sample of both are enclosed. Make photocopies of both before using them or you may retype your own.
After your Land Patent is filed, you must send a photocopy by Certified Mail Return Receipt Requested to your bank or mortgage company, FLB, FMRA, PCA, etc and to any and all parties that may have an equitable interest in your property so they have been placed on NOTICE that you are updating the Land Patent in your name and they will have 60 days to challenge your claim to your allodial title in a court of law or forever keep their silence. Be sure to keep your green tickets when they come back.

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[reference link lost]

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The Land Patent is the only form of perfect title to land available in the United States. Wilcox v. Jackson, 38 PET (U.S.) 498; 10 L.Ed. 26The “Warranty Deed” is merely a “color of title”. Color of Title means: “That which is a semblance or appearance of title, but not title in fact or in law.” Howth v. Farrar, C.C.A. Tex.; 94 F.2d 654, 658; McCoy v. Lowrie, 42 Wash. 2d 24, Black’s Law Sixth Ed.

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In the history of this county no Land Patent has ever lost an appellate review in the courts. As a matter of fact in Summa Corp. v California, 466 US 198 the Supreme Court ruled forever that the Land Patent would always win over any other form of title. In that case the land in question was tidewater land and California’s claim was based on California’s constitutional right to all tidewater lands. The patent stood supreme even against California’s Constitution.

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Source link: http://thearizonasentinel.com/2013/04/08/allodial-title-land-patent-heres-the-question/

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CLC Permalink: http://clibertyc.com/?p=87818

The Arizona Sentinel About The Arizona Sentinel
In an interview a few years ago, while running for Governor, Bruce Olsen said, "We are running out of time. I’m convinced I can work with other governors to save our Republic. I have a plan, should our country fall apart. We must be prepared. It’s important that our people become debt free. I am also hoping to change the way we title property. We must see to it that Americans actually own what they pay for. One more thing. We must learn that the individuals that our media promotes for elected office, are the ones we must run from." Bruce Olsen lives in Arizona and shares from The Arizona Sentinel. His main site went down in 2016 and this link contains some of his earlier work. You can still see some of his more recent work via Constitutional Liberty Coalition.

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