Jason Murphey

I wrote an article in 2011 about a new, disturbing trend of political correctness which I strongly believed presented a real danger to the ability of policymakers to engage in honest and open debate.

Here’s what happened.

The Oklahoma Constitutio…

OK Historical Society and a New Way to Learn from Past Mistakes

jason-photoJason Murphey

Local news outlets recently highlighted the planned implosion of two buildings in downtown Oklahoma City. Media footage featured cheering crowds as the historic buildings fell. I am a bit hesitant to join in the excitement that accompanies the destruction of iconic buildings. These scenes tend to remind me of the many Guthrie-area buildings which have been destroyed over the years, the first a…

Continue reading >

jason-photoThere are amazing benefits and learning opportunities available to those who closely monitor the state legislative process. I have learned much about human behavior and individual character through observation during those times when policy makers are under pressure. Policy makers may work on legislation for months, if not years, only to see their efforts come to an screeching halt when their …

Continue reading via Source post

OKG permalink

OKLAHOMA CITY – Conflicting requirements of overlapping state and local regulatory agencies are proving disruptive to business owners/operators, a legislative panel was advised Wednesday.

It “creates chaos” and “tends to harm business activity,” state Rep. Jason Murphey, R-Guthrie, said during an interim legislative study meeting of the House Committee on Business, Labor and Retirement Laws. Members of the committee include Reps. David Perryman, D-Chickasha; Will Fourkiller, D-Stilwell; and Shane Stone, D-Oklahoma City.

“It creates a confusing situation for the businessperson who has to figure out how to satisfy one entity while not being in violation with another,” Murphey, who requested the study of regulatory reform, said recently.

Melissa Holland, executive director of the Oklahoma Assisted Living Association, said that two “large” assisted-living companies told her that they will not expand beyond the facilities they already operate in Oklahoma because they have found it “hard to do business” in this state.

Read more via Source post: http://www.hd31.org/news.php?title=conflicting-state-and-local-regulations-cause-heartburn-for-businesses-legislators-told

OKG Permalink: http://okgrassroots.com/?p=529885

I remember that day in 2009 as one of those busy days in which I struggled to keep up with work. I was almost certainly tempted to direct my legislative assistant to refuse all visitors so that I could get my work done; however, I didn’t feel right about doing that and instead said, “If anyone comes in, please let them know that I can only meet for five minutes.”

My next visitor took far longer than five minutes. And I am glad he did.

Read more via Source Post here: http://www.hd31.org/blog.php?title=losing-a-kindred-spirit

OKG Permalink:http://okgrassroots.com/?p=528468

The Senate Transparancy Conundrum

Regular readers of the state’s appropriations bill were greeted by something new as they opened this year’s version of the venerable legislation.

Historically, the bill has contained a section-by-section narrative detailing the assignment, or transfer, of dollars to the many government agencies and programs. This document, often confused with the state budget, assigns about 7 billion of the approximate 17.5 billion spent by state government.

In reality, only about 30% of state government spend goes through the legislative process. What about the other 10 billion of spend?

Continue reading via Source post HD31 here.

OKG permalink:  http://okgrassroots.com/?p=524418

Jason Murphey HD31I have always believed that citizens are the best positioned to hold government accountable. Unlike legislators, citizens are not subject to co-option by bureaucracy, unlike the press, they need not fear loss of access if they take a tough stand against the actions of government.

Citizens need powerful tools to enable oversight. Until recently, these tools weren’t easily available; however, advancements in technology are finally allowing taxpayers to truly oversee government action.

 

Read more here >>>

OKG Permalink: http://okgrassroots.com/?p=520367

Related posts:

  1. Opening the Door to the Golden Cage It’s a program so effective that other states are seeking to copy it. It was featured on the local news last week as News 9’s Alex Cameron took his cameras…
  2. Jason Murphey has Fantastic News for the Taxpayer It is perhaps the best news from this legislative year and a reform for which legislative and state leaders should rightly take credit. It could represent the key turning point…
  3. The Opportunity for the State Chamber of Commerce to find its Soul As an office holder, it didn’t take long for me to observe the sharp tension between many of those who make up the grassroots, small government constituency and the State…
  4. Working on Saturday vs. Transparency The circumstances of Wednesday, May 22 brought me to the stark realization that two important concepts of reform have been abandoned by the Legislature. For years I passionately believed in…

It is perhaps the best news from this legislative year and a reform for which legislative and state leaders should rightly take credit. It could represent the key turning point in a return to ethical governance and restore a balance in favor of Oklahoma taxpayers and away from special interests. Every year I have observed special interest raids on the public treasury through the creation or ex…

Read more source post here: http://www.hd31.org/blog.php?title=Fantastic-News-for-the-Taxpayer

Related posts:

  1. Opening the Door to the Golden Cage It’s a program so effective that other states are seeking to copy it. It was featured on the local news last week as News 9’s Alex Cameron took his cameras…
  2. Working on Saturday vs. Transparency The circumstances of Wednesday, May 22 brought me to the stark realization that two important concepts of reform have been abandoned by the Legislature. For years I passionately believed in…
  3. The Next Abandonment of Principle The first warning sign happened last year on April 2nd of 2014. By a 20-3 vote, a legislative committee unexpectedly approved a 30 million dollar diversion of transportation funding. Though…
  4. It Feels Like We Are Working for a Startup I knew the concern was legitimate, but believed the benefit from doing the right thing would outweigh the downside — as it always does.The detractors to Oklahoma’s state government information…

It’s a program so effective that other states are seeking to copy it. It was featured on the local news last week as News 9’s Alex Cameron took his cameras inside the headquarters of Oklahoma’s new, unified IT entity. Cameron’s story, entitled “Keeping…

I knew the concern was legitimate, but believed the benefit from doing the right thing would outweigh the downside — as it always does.The detractors to Oklahoma’s state government information technology unification may have been willing to concede that a private business would never silo itself into many different IT departments as the state had done; and, that the consultant’s report sho…

Source post to see more

Related posts:

  1. Working on Saturday vs. Transparency The circumstances of Wednesday, May 22 brought me to the stark realization that two important concepts of reform have been abandoned by the Legislature. For years I passionately believed in…
  2. Unnecessary Government Spending Does Not Mean Better Service Imagine the following absurdity: a business owner divides his business into 140 different divisions and gives the head of each division control over a free-standing legal, information technology, financial service,…
  3. Holding Government Accountable for Open Meeting Violations A few weeks ago I wrote about the recent success of three important government transparency proposals which will go into law this year. One of these bills, Senate Bill 1497,…
  4. Oklahoma’s First African American Legislator To Finally Get Highway Recognition 7 Years Later OKLAHOMA CITY – The late Rep. A.C. Hamlin will finally get his due. In honor of Albert Comstock Hamlin, the first African American elected to the Oklahoma House of Representatives,…