Teaparty

Michigan Citizens, Houston we have a problem. Obama holdovers, Never Trumpers and deep state operatives are obstructing President Trump’s agenda and policy. And this time Michigan’s Rep. Kelly was a victim of that obstructionism after going…

Paul Cason Announces Candidacy for House 83

Paul Cason announced today that he will be a legislative candidate for the Republican
nomination in House District 83.

“Oklahoma is facing tough times, and it is crucial that we have principled conservative leaders in office to guide our government,” Cason said. “As an attorney who works with businesses every day, I have helped Oklahomans overcome tough legal issues. As a lawmaker, I will use that same expertise to guide policy decisions.”

District incumbent Randy McDaniel, a Republican, is leaving office due to term limits. “It is time to stop talking about the major issues confronting Oklahoma and start working toward achieving some tangible results,” Cason said.

Cason has long been active in Republican politics, having served as a staff assistant to U.S. Sen. James Inhofe and as a field director in Alaska for the Republican National Committee during the 2014 election cycle. Cason interned in 2013 with then-Congressman James Lankford.

He earned his undergraduate degree from Purdue University where he studied History and Political Science. While at Purdue, Cason was involved in the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC) and held several leadership roles. He earned a Juris Doctorate from the Oklahoma City University School of Law.

Cason is currently a partner with the Rosell Law Group, focusing on business and estate issues.

“To grow Oklahoma’s economy and create jobs, we need to elect legislators who understand how rules and regulations impact the private sector,” Cason said. “My mission as State Representative will be to focus Oklahoma government on its core duties and otherwise streamline and eliminate regulation whenever possible.”

Cason, 32, serves on the Infant Crisis Services Young Professionals Board. He attends All Souls Episcopal Church.

REGISTERED LIBERTARIANS TO CHOOSE PARTY CANDIDATES

On Saturday September 7th, during a special meeting of the Executive Committee, the Libertarian Party of Oklahoma voted to allow only registered Libertarians to select the party’s candidates. All Libertarians currently registered as Independent should re-register in order to vote in the party primaries.

As of today, there are three gubernatorial candidates competing in the Libertarian primary to be held on June 26, 2018 with a runoff election on August 28, 2018. Indications predict primaries necessary for other races as well. All registered voters will be able to vote for the winning Libertarian candidates during the general election, on November 6, 2018.

Over the past several months, party members have been weighing the merits of both the open primary and closed primary options. Through the sponsorship of panel discussions and education events, the party has used participation in the decision making process as a positive way of engaging the community and energizing membership.

Immediately after the vote, party leaders expressed a renewed commitment to advancing party objectives and continuing to take advantage of the tremendous positive momentum currently being experienced.

“Decisions like this and others are welcome indications of growth for us. Going forward we will concentrate on the recruitment of candidates and making sure Oklahomans know we’re here. These are exciting times. There is another choice when it comes to the political direction of Oklahoma’s future,” said Libertarian Party Chair, Tina Kelly


On Monday, October 9th Tulsa businessman, Kevin Stitt, will officially announce his candidacy for Governor of the State of Oklahoma. Stitt is a Tulsa resident and CEO of Gateway Mortgage Group (GMG). The first-time candidate started GMG in 2000, has grown the company to around 1,100 employees and is licensed to do mortgages in 40 states. Under Stitt’s leadership, GMG created five unique pillars for success and he would like to do the same for the state.

Lamb Campaign Reaches 77 County Fundraising Goal

OKLAHOMA CITY, OK, October 6, 2017 – Oklahomans for Lamb announced today that individuals from all 77 Oklahoma counties have donated to the 2018 gubernatorial campaign of Todd Lamb, demonstrating the widespread appeal and network of his support. The campaign just concluded its third quarter fundraising period September 30th, following a second quarter in which Lamb raised the most ever in any reporting period by a Republican gubernatorial candidate.

“Money alone does not define a campaign, however I am extremely honored by the trust and generosity Oklahomans have extended to me, and I sincerely thank each and every one of them,” Lamb said. “Grassroots support is extremely important, and that is why I am running a 77-county campaign. While other campaigns may focus only on the Oklahoma City and Tulsa metropolitan areas, I know it will take all corners of the state working together to put Oklahoma on the proper course it needs. Our collective future among urban and rural citizens is intertwined, and as I continue to visit with Oklahomans regarding my plan to ‘Renew Oklahoma’, I am convinced my conservative message is the right one for Oklahoma.”

“From a political perspective, it is very important to reach across Oklahoma,” said Keith Beall, Oklahomans for Lamb campaign manager. “If you examine the 71 counties outside of the two metropolitan areas, they account for 47% of Republican primary voters and 50% of general election voters. We are the only gubernatorial campaign to have statewide depth, and having a network throughout Oklahoma provides us with a solid foundation for the next 13 months.”

Oklahomans interested in learning more about the Lamb campaign may visit votetoddlamb.com,
call the campaign headquarters at 405.252.4289, email the campaign at info@votetoddlamb.com, or follow the campaign on Facebook and Twitter.

From OCPA: “Earlier today, former United States Senator Tom Coburn, former Oklahoma Governor Frank Keating, and former Oklahoma Secretary of State Larry Parman sent a letter to Oklahoma lawmakers. In it, the three conservative leaders urged lawmakers to finally right-size government, pointing out that Oklahoma is hurting because Oklahomans are hurting.”

Here is the letter:

Dear Oklahoma Policymakers,

Ronald Reagan once wisely warned: “In this present crisis, government is not the solution to our problem. Government is the problem.” About taxes and spending, he said, “The problem is not that people are taxed too little, the problem is that government spends too much.” These words of wisdom apply directly to fiscal policies being debated in Oklahoma today.

Take, for example, the last several legislative sessions. Numerous lobbyists for special interests and numerous government executives have worked to focus the discussion on how to take more money from Oklahoma’s most vulnerable citizens, from working Oklahoma families, and from small businesses and job creators.

Each session, the discussion has focused on cries for more revenue, money to be taken from Oklahomans by their government.

The reality, though, is that Oklahomans are hurting—due in large part to the significant price declines in oil and to the failures of the Obama administration’s economic policies and regulations. The Oklahoma Tax Commission reports that from 2014 to 2015 Oklahomans lost more than $13 billion in taxable income. Further, from FY-2015 to FY-2016, Oklahomans cut their purchases subject to state sales and use tax by $4.1 billion just to survive. From September 2015 to September 2016, fully 21,800 oil and gas and manufacturing jobs were cut.

Given what Oklahomans are facing, now more than ever is the time for policymakers to steel themselves and get about the tough work of reforming Oklahoma’s government. This means focusing funding on critical core functions while working to implement efficiencies. It’s time to craft a state budget that respects Oklahoma families’ budgets.

Now more than ever, policymakers must deliver on their campaign promises to right-size government and adjust it to the current tax burden borne by Oklahomans.

During stern times like these, it is unwise to fall for the trap that is state-level “tax-reform”—when this really means raising taxes on Oklahomans and permanently cementing unreformed state spending so that government can avoid the hard choices Oklahomans have to make every day. Policymakers should especially resist increasing tax burdens on Oklahomans while a lack of transparency in agency spending still exists.

Policymakers should work tirelessly until all expenditures of every state agency are reviewed by our elected legislators. No state agency should hire lobbyists or staff with state funds in order to lobby for even more taxpayer money. Sound and fiscally conservative policy must always consider reforms and prioritizing spending. The people of Oklahoma have spoken clearly in favor of this approach. Most state office holders have earned their offices by voicing support of these principles.

Some claim that recent special-election results show that policymakers aren’t taxing their constituents enough. Nothing could be further from the truth. Voters will reward those who keep their promises, who work tirelessly to rein in the bureaucracy and special interests—and who carry out their duties and personal lives with moral integrity. When policymakers break promises, avoid reining in the bureaucracy, and have moral failings, none should be surprised when they themselves and those who claim to wear their political colors suffer electoral defeat.

During this special session, those who claim the principles and label of Ronald Reagan must act on their promises. Those principles reject all tax increases and efforts to generate more revenue during times like these. State reports and certified revenue documents show that lawmakers have already passed legislation which increased annual revenues available for appropriation by more than $500 million over the last three legislative sessions.

It is time to dig in to eradicate crony capitalism. It is time to rein in unreformed spending. It is time for real, market-driven Medicaid reforms and innovative health care spending. It is time to be honest about non-instructional growth in common and higher education. It is time to implement government-wide business process improvements and reform outdated government structures.

Policymakers must make the same difficult choices being made by the most vulnerable, by working Oklahoma families, and by small businesses and other job creators in Oklahoma.

Onward,

Tom Coburn
Former United States Senator

Frank Keating
Former Oklahoma Governor

Larry Parman
Former Oklahoma Secretary of State and Secretary of Commerce

Supreme Court Justice Joseph Watt to Retire

OKLAHOMA CITY – Governor Mary Fallin today received and accepted a letter from Oklahoma Supreme Court Justice Joseph Watt stating his intention to retire at the end of this year.

Watt, justice for the 9th Supreme Court Judicial District, wrote that his retirement will take effect Dec. 31.

Watt, of Altus, began his judicial service in 1985, when he was appointed special district judge for Jackson County. He was elected associated district judge for Jackson County in 1986.

In 1991, then-Gov. David Walters named Watt as his general counsel. He was appointed by Walters to the Oklahoma Supreme Court on May 17, 1992, and is in his 26th year of service on the high court. He served two terms as chief justice, from 2003 until 2007.

“Having spent almost half of my entire life serving in the judicial branch of government, the past 25½ years on the Supreme Court have been the most rewarding of my entire life,” Watt said. “As the new year dawns, I look forward to beginning the next chapter in my life spending more quality time with my grandchildren, traveling with my wife, Cathy, and taking active retired status beginning Jan. 1, 2018.”

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Conservative leaders urge Oklahoma politicians to protect taxpayers

September 28, 2017

Dear Governor and State Lawmakers,

We are a coalition of conservative citizens, many of us serving in leadership of state or local organizations, who write to urge you to address the need for more consolidation and other efficiencies in all areas of state government and to resist raising taxes on your constituents.

Many Oklahoma families and businesses are struggling and have been forced to reduce their own spending. Indeed, Oklahomans lost more than $13 billion in taxable income and reduced purchases by $4.1 billion in one year alone when oil prices collapsed.

And yet, Oklahoma’s total state government spending is at an all-time high. The state is now on track to spend more money next year—more than $17.9 billion—than at any time in our history. If you believe that certain state services are not adequately funded, we urge you to prioritize spending rather than raise taxes.

“Limited government” and “lower taxes” have been winning campaign messages in Oklahoma over the last decade. Some candidates have even made written promises to oppose and vote against (or veto) “any and all efforts to increase taxes.” We encourage you to stay true to these principles and to oppose efforts to increase the burden of government on hard-working Oklahoma families.

Sincerely,


OCPA’s Center for Investigative Journalism revealed some shocking news this week about the spending habits of Oklahoma’s Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust (TSET). TSET is a state agency created to fund programs that help people quit smoking and help pay for the costs of smoking-related health care.

TSET was formed as a result of the state’s lawsuit against tobacco companies in the 1990s, and currently sits on an endowment worth over $1 billion. It brings in and spends about $50 million every year on tobacco cessation campaigns or health issues related to tobacco use. Or rather, that’s what TSET is supposed to use the money for.