Supreme Court

ANNAPOLIS, Md. (Jan. 11, 2023) – A bill introduced in the Maryland House would ban “no-knock” warrants and take a step toward nullifying several Supreme Court opinions in practice and effect. Del. Gabriel Acevero (D) introduced House Bill 38 (HB38) on Jan. 11. The legislation would prohibit judges from issuing no-knock warrants defined as “a search […]

The post Maryland Bill Would Ban No-Knock Warrants first appeared on Tenth Amendment Center.

A signer of the Declaration of Independence, Chase had been impeached by the House of Representatives for his role in the Sedition Act Crisis of 1798-1799. In 1798, Congress passed an act that made it a criminal offense to criticize the President of the United States and members of Congress.

The post Today in History: Preparations Begin for Impeachment Trial of Justice Samuel Chase first appeared on Tenth Amendment Center.

The legislation would ban Texas judges from issuing warrants allowing “no-knock” entry. The bill defines “no-knock entry” as “a peace officer’s entry, for the purpose of executing a warrant, into a building or other place without giving notice of the officer’s authority or purpose before entering.”

The post Texas Bill Would Ban “No-Knock” Warrants first appeared on Tenth Amendment Center.

In the bump stick case, the plaintiffs demonstrate what not to do; surrender their bump stocks and then sue after the fact. They should have refused to turn them in to anyone and fought for legislation prohibiting local law enforcement from actively assisting any federal authorities on the matter.

The post Supreme Court Upholds Bump Stock Ban. Again. first appeared on Tenth Amendment Center.

October 19, 1789 – John Jay was sworn in as the first Chief Justice of the United States. Even a quick overview of his views on the Constitution, war and peace, property rights and more – can show just how far almost everyone today is from our founding principles.

The post First Chief Justice: They Don’t Make ‘Em Like They Used To first appeared on Tenth Amendment Center.

Washington nominated Jay for the position on Sept. 24, the same day he signed the Judiciary Act of 1789, and the Senate unanimously confirmed Jay two days later.

The post Today in History: John Jay Sworn in as First Chief Justice of the United States first appeared on Tenth Amendment Center.

And it would demonstrate that originalist judging is not (as some have charged) just a cover for a conservative agenda.

The post Another Shot at the Insular Cases first appeared on Tenth Amendment Center.

the fact that the MQD applies a clear statement rule instead of applying close textual analysis isn’t novel or contrary to originalism. 

The post An Originalist Defense of the Major Questions Doctrine first appeared on Tenth Amendment Center.