Necessary is Supposed to Mean Necessary

When the Constitution was ratified, the word necessary meant, well, necessary. But in just a few short years, that was changed to convenient, or useful, giving the federal government the nearly unlimited power it has today.

Path to Liberty: Sept 28, 2022

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Overview: Necessary and Proper Clause

Hamilton – Federalist 33

Necessary and Proper: Not Anything and Everything

The Original Meaning of “Necessary” in the Necessary and Proper Clause

James Madison – Virginia Ratifying Convention (15 June 1788)

James Madison on the Necessary and Proper Clause

James Madison – Speech on the Bank Bill (2 Feb 1791)

Thomas Jefferson – Opinion on the Constitutionality of a National Bank (15 Feb 1791)

Alexander Hamilton – Opinion on the Constitutionality of an Act to Establish a Bank (23 Feb 1791)

Necessary Does Not Mean Useful or Convenient

John Marshall – McCulloch v. Maryland (1819)

James Madison to Spencer Roane (2 Sept 1819)

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