History

On this date in 1749, Edward Rutledge was born. He was a signer of the Continental Association and the youngest signatory to the Declaration of Independence.

The post Today in History: Founding Father Edward Rutledge Born first appeared on Tenth Amendment Center.

Peace, friendship, and a mutual understanding helped pave the way for North Carolina’s eventual ratification.

The post Today in History: North Carolina Becomes 12th State to Ratify the Constitution first appeared on Tenth Amendment Center.

Alexander Hamilton developed the terms of the treaty, and George Washington appointed John Jay as a special envoy to negotiate with the British using instructions penned by Hamilton. At the time, Jay was serving as the chief justice of the Supreme Court.

The post Today in History: Jay Treaty Signed Sparking Intense Partisan Debate first appeared on Tenth Amendment Center.

In-person absentee voting will be available at in every county on Wednesday through Friday, November 2 – 4, 2022 from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m., and on Saturday, November 5, 2022, from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. In most counties, this will be at the County Elect…

Strategy for responding to the largest government in history – right from the founders and old revolutionaries. Learn about the Continental Association, approved by the First Continental Congress on Oct 20, 1774. It was the first of four major founding documents, along with the Declaration of Independence, the Articles of Confederation and the Constitution for the United States.

The post First of the Founding Four: Continental Association first appeared on Tenth Amendment Center.

Today in 1781, the Battle of Yorktown concluded with a Franco-American triumph over the British, a decisive conclusion to the American War for Independence.

The post Today in History: British Surrender at Yorktown first appeared on Tenth Amendment Center.

October 19, 1789 – John Jay was sworn in as the first Chief Justice of the United States. Even a quick overview of his views on the Constitution, war and peace, property rights and more – can show just how far almost everyone today is from our founding principles.

The post First Chief Justice: They Don’t Make ‘Em Like They Used To first appeared on Tenth Amendment Center.

Washington nominated Jay for the position on Sept. 24, the same day he signed the Judiciary Act of 1789, and the Senate unanimously confirmed Jay two days later.

The post Today in History: John Jay Sworn in as First Chief Justice of the United States first appeared on Tenth Amendment Center.