R3publicans

by Justin Raimondo Posted on May 28, 2017

Author’s note: I had actually started to write a Memorial Day column when I looked up this piece from 2012, which says almost precisely what I intended to say. When you’ve been writing a column covering foreign affairs for over twenty years, as I have, repetition is inevitable, but what follows captures my view of this holiday and its contemporary meaning so completely that I decided to give it to my readers, rather than attempt to replicate the same thoughts albeit in different words.

We might as well get rid of Memorial Day, for all the good it does us. Originally “Decoration Day,” the last Monday in May has been the designated time for us to remember the war dead and honor their sacrifice – while, perhaps, taking in the lessons of the many conflicts that have marked our history as a free nation. In line with the modern trend of universal trivialization, however, the holiday has been paganized to mark the beginning of summer, when we get out the barbecue grill and have the neighbors over for hamburgers and beer. As for contemplating the meaning of the day in the context of our current and recent wars, that is left to those few pundits who pay attention to foreign policy issues, or else to writers of paeans to the “Greatest Generation” – World War II being the only modern war our panegyrists deign to recall, since it is relatively untouched by the ravages of historical revisionism.

read more at http://original.antiwar.com/justin/2017/05/28/abolish-memorial-day-3/

summary via R3publican

US Coalition Strikes Are Causing Soaring Casualties

by Jason Ditz, May 26, 2017

Exemplified by the hundred and some odd people they’ve killed in the last 48 hours, the US is struggling mightily with the narrative that they are taking extraordinary care to limit the number of civilian casualties in the air war in Syria, and are rapidly losing any pretense of a moral high ground.

read more at http://news.antiwar.com/2017/05/26/us-is-killing-more-civilians-in-syria-air-war-than-assad-is/

summary via R3publican

  Gov. Fallin wanted us to pay $2 billion more in taxes. The Budget Chairs tried to push at least half of that, but in the end got most of a billion more of our next year’s income.  The legislators all went home. The documents all went to the governor’s office. Thinktanks on the left and right are consulting attorneys for an inevitable court fight over the highly questionable decisions of the Republican leadership. ​Total Spent   &nbsp […]

Read the full article at SoonerPolitics.org here.

Top NSA Whistleblower: “Every time there is a terrorist attack, what We really need to do is demand that they CUT the budgets of all the intelligence agencies”

Posted on December 3, 2015 by WashingtonsBlog

The highest-level NSA whistleblower in history – William Binney – the high-level NSA executive who created the agency’s mass surveillance program for digital information, 36-year NSA veteran widely regarded as a “legend” within the agency, who served as the senior technical director within the agency, and managed thousands of NSA employees – has a great suggestion for motivating U.S. intelligence agencies to prevent terrorism.

read further at http://www.washingtonsblog.com/2015/12/top-nsa-whistleblower-every-time-terrorist-attack-really-need-demand-cut-budgets-intelligence-agencies.html

summary via R3publican

A Constitutional Crisis has now arrived. The Legislative leaders did the unthinkable. They blatantly raised taxes several times and in several ways that the constitution strictly forbids.  Today, the session has adjourned ‘sine die’ [latin for “with no appointed date for resumption”] . Tax Week Failures   When the two chambers failed to legally pass enough revenue increases before last Monday morning, to pacify the state’s appetite; The […]

Read the full article at SoonerPolitics.org here.

Oklahoma Senate Pro Tem comments on 2017 session
Says REAL ID, energy jobs policy wins during challenging budget year

OKLAHOMA CITY – Oklahoma Senate President Pro Tempore Mike Schulz commented on the 2017 session, saying great policy bookended a session dominated by a $1 billion budget shortfall.

“The Oklahoma Senate worked this session with the goal of ensuring the policies we enacted had long-term vision and set Oklahoma on the path to success now and years down the line. Despite a session that was dominated by the $1 billion shortfall, the Senate was able to enact important policies that will help grow our economy, create jobs and generate wealth, and yield new revenues for the state budget.